Monday, November 1, 2010

Life of an Entrepreneur by Chris Coltran

A very good friend of mine shared this article with me about being an entrepreneur. I agree with the author that this is not a negative article by any means. It just outlines some of the things one needs to understand about being an entrepreneur and working for yourself. I love not having a boss. I love not having anyone telling me what to do. This is not true for everyone. Some people need a manager to guide them through their day and to tell them what to do.

Being an entrepreneur usually means that your friends and family won't understand what you do. It is true that titles mean nothing when you work for yourself. You have to be your own janitor if necessary. You also find that you can't do it all yourself. It would be nice, and save you some money too, but you have to be willing to admit that sometimes it's better to hire someone else who already has the expertise and can do it better and more efficiently than yourself. There is no such thing as an overnight success in the real world and you can't control the universe, although it would be nice.

Please click this link to read the full article.

ChrisColtran.com

Thursday, October 28, 2010

The Importance of Water and your Performance

When was the last time you sat down and had a tall glass of water? Water is critical for every function in your body (including your brain) and in order to be in tip-top shape when it comes to performing your job duties, you need to be hydrated. You might find it interesting that not all waters are created equal.
Use this link to read about the importance of drinking alkaline water

Monday, April 26, 2010

The Grandmother Philosophy by Chris Coltran

I was working as a sales rep for a flooring distributor and awoke to the usual sound of a 6:30 am wake up call. By 8:00 am I was headed to my first appointment of the day.

Of all the sales calls, sales meetings, and sales trainings I had ever attended, today would prove to be the most important sales lesson of them all, and a turning point in my career. Little did I know, everything in my life would change before returning to my hotel room later that evening.

After spending a few minutes saying hello to a half dozen salespeople, I sat down with the general manager and owner for my appointment. The first item on my agenda was ask John to answer a question that I had been curious about since our last meeting. John’s store, in a market with a population of 90,000 people, had consistently been in the top 5 in the country, and I wanted to know why? What were they doing differently? What was their secret? How could they be so highly ranked when they were competing against stores in much larger markets? John’s response was one that I will never forget.

He thought that if he told me I would laugh, but after promising not to, he told me he felt the reason his store had been so successful was because he had always told his salespeople to treat their customers like they would treat their own Grandma.

I immediately looked at John and said, “What a great idea for a book!” His response was, “Yeah! But who would write it?”

As soon as I walked out of his store, I thought to myself, why not me?

When I arrived back to my hotel that evening, I made the first outline of what I had decided to call the Grandmother Philosophy.

If you were selling new furniture to your Grandmother, imagine how much better you might treat her compared to a regular customer. You would make sure and only show her products that you would feel comfortable with her buying, and you would never sell her a product that you would not put into your own home. You would give her a fair price, and you wouldn’t try to cheat her or take advantage of her. Because she is your Grandmother, she expects you to make a profit. What kind of Grandmother wouldn’t want her grandson or granddaughter to make a good living? You would try to sell her your best products, and not let her buy something that might not withstand the test of time. You would put your best delivery crew on the job, and you would make sure they were on time and professional. The day of her delivery, you would stop by her house on your lunch break to make sure everything had going smoothly. If she had a problem, you would take care of it immediately, and not give her the runaround. You would call her the day after delivery and verify that everything was to her satisfaction. You would give her the best service you possibly could.

The more I thought about the Grandmother Philosophy, the more I realized I had to write the book. The first three months were challenging, so much so that I had almost given up. The struggle was internal, because I only told my wife what I was attempting to do. I had heard many people say they intended to write a book someday, but they had never done it. I didn’t want to be another statistic. Determined to take a simple concept and transform it into a philosophy, and the thought of walking into a bookstore and seeing that someone else had written my book is what kept me going. I didn’t want to be one of those people to see a great idea and say, “Hey, I thought of that. If only I had acted on it?”

The Grandmother Philosophy is an acronym for the word Grandmother:

Greet every customer immediately
Read body language
Attitude is Everything.
Never Prejudge
Do unto others as you would want done unto you.
Make an impression that will last a lifetime.
Own your Products.
Think like a Salesperson.
Honesty, Honesty, Honesty.
Everyone is a potential customer.
Remember to “Treat Every Customer Like You Would Treat Your Own Grandmother.”

Chris Coltran is based in Acworth, GA. He is the author of the book, “Selling To Your Grandmother,” and President of C2 Unlimited. He has worked in manufacturing, distribution, wholesale, and retail, as well as being a sales and marketing consultant to various companies. Chris is a motivational speaker, having spoken to various groups in the floor covering, furniture, automotive, and service industries.

For more info on Chris, Please visit:
www.chriscoltran.com
www.chriscoltran.com/chris
www.atlantanutritionfacts.com